Sweet Blintzes? The Horror!

The blintz that has become standard issue in the U.S. over the past 30 or so years is not the blintz of my childhood. I dream about my grandmother’s blintzes, and her kugel, and her gefilte fish, all of them uncorrupted by sugar. (Even the bagel my sister just offered to share with me, flavored with cinnamon and raisins, strikes me as an aberration, some kind of alternative foodstuff that has nothing to do with the Sunday morning bagels of my youth.)

I never tasted a sweet blintz until I came to New York for college. I had been delighted to see blintzes, standard fare in our family at least once a week, offered for brunch, until I tasted them. Blueberry sauce? Strawberries? Cherries? Those belonged in sweetrolls (what Danishes were called in Milwaukee), not on a blintz.

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God Bless Shavuot, the Holiday of 40-Year-Olds

When you’re a child, the hierarchy of Jewish holidays is clear and unequivocal. Purim, day of pandemonium, reigns supreme, with its costumes and its cookies and its invitations for mischief, followed closely by Hanukkah and its eight crazy nights and Passover, purveyor of the afikoman and its bounties. Sukkot and its festive decorations, Rosh Hashanah and its honeyed apples, Yom Kippur and its comforting quiet all follow suit, delightfully obvious even to an 8-year-old. All, that is, except for Shavuot.

What, after all, has the holiday to offer to the young and the restless? Blintzes are nice, but look at Shavuot through the bright eyes of a child, and you’ll see little to amuse or delight. Until, that is, you wake up one morning in Sivan and discover that you’re in your forties and Shavuot is your favorite new holiday.

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A Walking Tour of Secret Jerusalem

“Jerusalem is built on layers, and each layer is true,” Sarah Tuttle-Singer writes in Jerusalem Drawn and Quartered, a memoir published earlier this month. Over the course of five-odd hours on a Sunday in March, the Times of Israel’s new media editor took me on a top-to-bottom tour. We didn’t get to every layer or every truth, something which would of course be impossible. “You need a million years to collect stories about Jerusalem, and it will never be enough,” an antiques dealer and character from Tuttle-Singer’s book mused in irresistibly literary fashion, later handing me an ancient and vaguely daisy-shaped one agurah coin as a keepsake. But we got to enough layers for one afternoon: We climbed on rooftops, met residents of every Abrahamic faith, plumbed an earthy bowl of Hummus Arafat (not as good as nearby Hummus Lina, but people of good conscience can disagree), encountered additional characters from her book, twirled glistening ribbons of knafeh (Jafar Sweets Company—write it down), and also narrowly avoided witnessing a deadly act of political violence near the Damascus Gate. What more could you ask for? After parting ways, standing before the Western Wall under a coral twilight sky and seeing news break that a Palestinian from Nablus had stabbed a 32-year-old Israeli man on Hagai street in the Muslim Quarter— the explanation for the seemingly dozens of policemen who had exploded past me near the Jaffa Gate about 20 minutes earlier—the dome of holy madness, delusion, and wonder that separates Jerusalem from the Ramles or the Ramallahs of the world felt vacuum-sealed even tighter than usual.

Tuttle-Singer’s book, which she said she wrote in only three weeks, attempts to return Jerusalem to earthly tangibility while also reveling in the city’s weirdness. Our first activity was all too tangible: Clambering over a fence, an air conditioning unit, and a disintegrating concrete barrier to reach the upper rooftops above King David Street in the Christian Quarter, which she noted was an excellent spot to drink or smoke at sunset. Gravel and maroon-rusted barbed wire were crushed flat into the ground, if indeed you could call it “the ground.” Shopkeepers hustled kippot and sheshbesh boards on the tunnel-like street below, and the near-distant octagon of the Dome of the Rock gleamed at what appeared to be eye level, static and inscrutable as the moon.

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A Demonstration of Some of the More Unusual Guitar Techniques Set to Minor Blues Soundtrack

The really amiable and talented Steve Onotera aka SamuraiGuitarist demonstrated some of the more unusual guitar techniques and devices to a soundtrack of a minor blues jam. These techniques ranged from relatively inoffensive (playing the lick) to forgivable (beer bottle slide) to completely ridiculous (pinky only playing, reversing strings, kill switch jamming). While Onotera’s advice is very helpful, it’s still fun to try these things out for oneself.

Here’s a little minor blues jam with some strange guitar techniques. Why? Because it’s fun to get funky and weird!

The post A Demonstration of Some of the More Unusual Guitar Techniques Set to Minor Blues Soundtrack appeared first on Laughing Squid.

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Canadian Musician Channels Jimi Hendrix During an Incredible Cover of ‘Voodoo Child’ on a Ukulele

Canadian musician and songwriter James Hill, who has been called a ukulele virtuoso, channeled Jimi Hendrix in a incredible live cover of “Voodoo Child (Slight Return)“. Hill impressively shredded the lead without a single mistake and skillfully employed clever strumming techniques to give the song the fuller sound it needed.

Video recorded live without looping or overdubs.
RECIPE:
1 Mya-Moe baritone ukulele (Low G – G – B – E)
1 guitar amp (Fender Blues Junior or equivalent)
1 bass amp (15 inch)
1 line splitter (Radial ABY box)
1 Diamond J-Drive pedal (made in Halifax, NS!)
4 busted strings
2 broken fingernails
Season to taste and serve hot!

via Open Culture

The post Canadian Musician Channels Jimi Hendrix During an Incredible Cover of ‘Voodoo Child’ on a Ukulele appeared first on Laughing Squid.

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Mesmerizing Slow Motion Footage of Small Magnets Completely Engulfing Larger Magnets

Magnets Engulfing Magnets

The YouTube channel Magnetic Games has posted a wonderfully mesmerizing slow motion video that shows how small magnets completely engulf a larger magnet when the two are placed near each other. One such interaction even has a particular resemblance to a beloved character from the MCU.

Tony Stark Magnet

The collisions between magnets are amazing, these shots in slow motion were made at 1000 fps….The clash between the red balls and the big magnet looks like the nanotechnology armor of ironman who wears Tony Stark in the last Avenger movie

Green Beads Magnets

via reddit

The post Mesmerizing Slow Motion Footage of Small Magnets Completely Engulfing Larger Magnets appeared first on Laughing Squid.

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Melissa McCarthy Investigates Muppet Killings in the Highly Irreverent Film ‘The Happytime Murders’

No Sesame. All Street.

In the highly irreverent trailer for the rather raunchy Brian Henson directed movie “The Happytime Murders“, a straight-laced detective (Melissa McCarthy) is forced to partner with a puppet in order to solve a string of muppet killings. Maya Rudolph, Joel McHale and Elizabeth Banks round out the cast for this “filthy comedy”.

THE HAPPYTIME MURDERS is a filthy comedy set in the seedy underbelly of Los Angeles where puppets and humans coexist. Two clashing detectives with a shared secret, one human (Melissa McCarthy) and one puppet, are forced to work together again to solve the brutal murders of the former cast of a beloved classic puppet television show.

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Nine Year Old Boy Has a Twitter Account Where He Documents Every Dog He’s Ever Petted

In 2016, a really wonderful then seven year old boy named Gideon started a blog called I’ve Pet That Dog, in order to document every dog with whom he’s come in contact and to help homeless animals find their perfect human. Since that time, Gideon has pet over 300 dogs and made his furry mission known to a over 43,000 followers on Twitter. Gideon sat down with Vice to talk about why he started the blog, how he finds the dogs to pet and his love for animals.

VICE: Why did you start “I’ve Pet That Dog”?
Gideon: Well, there’s a couple of reasons. One, I LOVEEE dogs. Two, I wanted to see how many dogs I could get. And three, I wanted to show the public about all of the dogs. I wanted to show everybody all of the dogs in the world. I don’t think I will ever do that, though. …What we do is, we drive around in a car and then when we see a dog we park. Then we get out and say, “Can I pet your dog?” Well, that’s what I say. And sometimes they are like, “What??”

via Vice, Bored Panda

The post Nine Year Old Boy Has a Twitter Account Where He Documents Every Dog He’s Ever Petted appeared first on Laughing Squid.

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400 consecutive hotter-than-average months and we’re still pretending climate change isn’t real


The last time Earth experienced a cooler-than-average month, a non-insignificant percentage of our readers hadn’t been born yet. Ronald Reagan was President, “Like a Virgin” was the earworm of the moment, and I was two years old. Since that fateful December, we’ve been on an incredible run of 400 months with above-average temperatures, according to scientists from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. It’s a good thing climate change doesn’t exist, or I’d be pretty worried. The concept of global warming was created by and for the Chinese in order to make U.S. manufacturing non-competitive. — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump)…

This story continues at The Next Web

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