How Prolific Session Musician Carol Kaye Created Some of Music’s Most Iconic Guitar and Bass Lines

Music writer Polyphonic, who creates incredibly informative video essays introduced a lot of people (myself included) Carol Kaye. Kaye was a rare female in the world of session musicians, but she made a name for herself very quickly with her prodigious ability to play guitar and bass. Throughout her career, Kay worked with Phil Specter and played with Sam Cooke, Tina Turner, The Beach Boys, Sonny and Cher, Nancy Sinatra and Frank Zappa, creating created some of the most iconic rock guitar and bass lines. When she left the session music, Kaye turned to television, playing theme music on such shows as Hawaii Five-0, Mission Impossible and The Brady Bunch.

In that time the late 60s and early 70s saw Kay do a lot of work for TV soundtracks. She played on the theme song of ‘The Brady Bunch’. Her bass is also present in the ‘Hawaii Five-0’ theme song. My favorite of her TV work comes from ‘Mission Impossible’, where she played bass on the original theme song from the 1960s show …her
other TV credits include ‘M*A*S*H’, ‘Hogan’s Heroes’, ‘The Addams Family’ and many more.

Here’s an amazing hour-long documentary about Carole Kaye’s incredible career.

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How the Anthropomorphic Storytelling of ‘Planet Earth’ Lets Humans Feel Empathy for the Animals

Debra Minoff and Susannah McCullough of the television and film analysis site ScreenPrism posited a very interesting question regarding the Planet Earth series of videos narrated by Sir David Attenborough, particularly why it has continually ranked higher than popular scripted shows such as Game of Thrones and Breaking Bad ? In answer to their own question, they explain that the universality of animal stories from childhood, combined with the poetic license of anthropomorphic storytelling, the attribution of both good and bad human qualities and immediate stories of good versus evil, allow humans watching feel a true sense of empathy for creatures in whom they see themselves.

The number one reason we love stories is this: we feel empathy for the characters. Empathy is distinct from sympathy. It doesn’t mean liking the characters necessarily it means seeing parts of ourselves in them, recognizing our shared humanity. So how do you make us recognize our humanity in animals? Planet Earth achieves this through anthropomorphic storytelling. The animals on screen are accessorized with human-like sentiments and thoughts.

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Photo Of The Day By Vincent Fricaud

Today’s Photo Of The Day is “Luscious Stream” by Vincent Fricaud. Location: Dutch Harbor, Unalaska, Alaska.

“Unalaska, nested in the Aleutian Islands chain, offers a strong sense of nature’s powerful will,” says Fricaud. “Battled by strong winds, protected by ragged cliffs, it is once you set foot on the land that you can embrace a little relief and appreciate peaceful hikes such as this one on the Ugadaga Bay Trail. The gale was muting all noise, until the trickle of water drew me away from the path to this canyon. It was quiet and calm, the water was as clear as it gets, and the moss hues made for a perfect shot.

Photo of the Day is chosen from various OP galleries, including AssignmentsGalleries and the OP Contests. Assignments have weekly winners that are featured on the OP website homepage, FacebookTwitter and Instagram. To get your photos in the running, all you have to do is submit them.

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