Feminism Fridays: Phyllis Chesler on the Radical Feminist Movement

In the mid-1960s, young African, Hispanic, Native, and Caucasian American activists became a driving force for civil rights, free speech, and academic freedom. In manifestos, conferences, and teach-ins, young Americans also opposed the Vietnam War, capitalism, and racism; some eventually became willing to use violence. The mainly male leaders fought about socialism versus communism, totalitarianism versus democratic socialism, and whether Soviet Russia or the United States was more to blame for the Cold War and the nuclear arms race. However, the quarrelsome male socialists, Black Power, Native, and Latino activists shut most women out of significant roles in these debates. In 1965 and 1966, many male movement leaders expected women to make them coffee, do the typing and mimeographing, and provide sex.

As feminist ideas gained currency, women on the left refused to be treated in this way. They began drafting manifestos of their own, which were treated with contempt. Some men also humiliated the women. When Marilyn Webb, a member of Students for a Democratic Society (SDS), tried to speak about women’s liberation, the men yelled: “Take her off the stage and fuck her.”

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Death of the Mobbed-Up Soviet Sinatra

Iosof Kobzon, sometimes also called Joseph, the English version of his name, was the Soviet Union’s maestro of World War II nostalgia and Communist kitsch. A Russian Jewish Frank Sinatra with the mob ties to show for it, he died Thursday at the age of 81.

From the conclusion of the Khrushchev era onward to the dissolution of the Soviet state,  Kobzon was the most famous singer in the Soviet Union. His public performances over 60 years made him the face for a genre of traditional music played in a popular style known as “Soviet estrada.” He  was continually compared to Frank Sinatra because of a shared crooner persona, style and mafia ties rather than for any musical affinities. In fact, since the mid-1990s, Kobzon had been denied entry into the United States because of business ties to the Russian mafioso Semyon Moglievich, as well as allegations of drug and arms trafficking. He would later spend 20 years serving in the Russian parliament.

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A Conversation Between Strangers on the Subway, One Hasidic and One Not, Takes a Strange Turn

I work in midtown on the east side. At the end of the day, I usually stroll over to 6th Avenue and catch the F train.  I need the exercise, and the walk helps clear my head. The final block before I reach the subway is my favorite. The sameness of skyscrapers and anonymous office workers comes to an abrupt end on the stretch of 47th Street known as the Diamond District.

Crossing Fifth Avenue, I enter a self-contained world. Shop windows display glittering diamonds. Hawkers, getting paid on commission, look to steer customers into stores, “We buy, we sell,” they chirp hopefully. Shop signs boast, “We pay the highest prices for gold, diamonds, and watches.” Arrows pointing up worn staircases run alongside advertisements for various businesses: watch repair, locksmith, pawnbroker, jewelry polishing, engraving, lender, kosher restaurant. Several store windows announce they accept bitcoin. Armored trucks—Brinks, Ferrari, Malca-Amit—transporting cash and diamonds line the block and are loaded by uniformed guards carrying guns in their holsters. Up and down the street, men cluster in small groups smoking and talking. Cigarette butts line the street. For reasons I cannot fathom, I’ve noticed that an unusually large number of people on this street walk with a limp. Sometimes, I buy fruit from an Indian man who often appears late in the afternoon selling boxes of blackberries, blueberries, and strawberries. By the time I descend the stairs into the subway, I have in only 20 minutes left my work life and been transported through an entirely different world before entering the underground, which, of course, is its own place.

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Random Acts of Kindness: Your Almost-End-of-Week Feel-Good Story

It’s Thursday. It’s been a long week. We’ve survived three months’ worth of breaking news cycles in just a few days. We’re tired, and we need some sweet story that reaffirms our basic belief, the one we refuse to abandon, that there are still decent humans out there and that sometimes, life works out just fine. Ready for your feel-good story? Sit back and read on.

It begins with a man named Chanan Rubin, until recently a member of Jerusalem’s city council. Earlier this month, he visited France, but when he returned to Israel, he made a terrible discovery: When returning his rental car at the airport in Lyon, he left a few of his bags in the back seat. He didn’t care much for most of what was in them, but one item stood out: his tefillin. Rubin called the car-rental company, but received nothing but a “mais non.” Frustrated, he took to the last refuge of the desperate man: Facebook, sharing his tale of woe and asking if there was anybody out there who might help.

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Elijah and the Burning Synagogue

We are approaching the first night of Selichot, the days leading up to Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur when supplications are recited in the wee hours of the night or before morning prayers to get us ready for the high holidays. As I prepare, I always think of my father and the Selichot service he was part of in 1939.

My father, Rabbi Simcha Shafran, passed away less than two years ago. In 1939 he was a 14-year-old living in a Polish town called Ruzhan (or Rózan).  He had made preparations to travel to Bialystok to study in a yeshivah but his plans were rudely interrupted by the German invasion of Poland on September 1, the start of the Second World War. He was only a boy at the time.

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Intense Fingernail Art That Looks Like Tiny Feet

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Nail Sunny, a well-known salon in Moscow, Russia creates some really fascinating nail art. One intense example of this is a design that shapes and paints a person’s nails so they look like the polished feet of an infant. The effect is disconcerting to say the least. The salon has other equally creative designs that they offer including a set of lipstick mouths in different stages of openness, a set of half peeled banana nails and a set of fierce tiger claws, just to name a few.

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via Geekologie

The post Intense Fingernail Art That Looks Like Tiny Feet appeared first on Laughing Squid.

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John Turturro Teaches a Kid About the World Wide Web in ‘Beginners Guide to the Internet’ (1999)

In 1999, actor John Turturro (Barton Fink, The Big Lebowski, The Night Of) partnered with search engine Lycos to provide “Beginner’s Guide to the Internet“, a 37 minute educational film about navigating the World Wide Web. While driving to Las Vegas, (Turturro’s character) Sam’s Volkswagen breaks down. He stops in the nearest town to get it fixed. While passing his time in the local diner, he logs onto his computer to send an email to his agent and a curious boy asks about the internet. The rest of the town soon follows after.

From the annals of famous actors in jobs they wish they had never accepted …. a 1999 how-to produced by Lycos starring John Turturro.

submitted via Laughing Squid Tips

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Japanese Warriors Crafted Out of Instant Noodles

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Graphic designer Taishi Arimura has created a brilliantly fun series of Japanese warriors crafted out of instant ramen, soba and udon noodles. The labels from each package are used as ceremonial garb and dinnerware are used as weapons.

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via Spoon and Tamago, Foodiggity

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Wonderfully Realistic Handmade Miniature Fender Electric Guitar Models Made From Popsicle Sticks

DIY miniaturist Cath of The Square to Spare offers up a really concise and helpful tutorial on making tiny Fender Stratocasters with simple crafting supplies such as popsicle sticks, crafting wire and paint. Particularly impressive is Cath’s technique for painting the sunburst pattern that’s so iconic to this guitar.

The second color will be the classic brown sunburst. Put raw sienna and burnt sienna color in water to create a stain. I’ll do two light coats of this color. Then for the edges I grab some black paint and a makeup sponge. Rip the sponge up and lightly dab it into the black, remove the excess then dab the black all around the edges. Paint it on slowly and retouch as you move towards the center. Go slow here because paint is a lot easier to put on than to remove.

Cath also did a tutorial on making a miniature acoustic guitar (with popsicle sticks).

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via Make:

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Clever Racoon Uses Problem Solving Skills to Open a Series of Gates That Lead to an Awaiting Treat

Problem Solving Raccoon Opens Gate

In an adorable clip from the BBC One series Animals Unexpected, a clever racoon named Rascal demonstrates her problem solving skills in real time. Presented with the challenge to open a series of gates to get to a stalk of broccoli at the end, Rascal ably goes about unlocking each gate, including the really difficult one that requires a bit of concentration, until she makes her way to her awaiting treat.

Racoons are as clever as monkeys… so what puzzles can Rascal tha racoon solve to get to a tasty treat?

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